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By in Latest News Comments Off on Statement: PLBTA On Liquor Licensing Fees Waived for 2021

Statement: PLBTA On Liquor Licensing Fees Waived for 2021

Chuck Moran, Executive Director

The following is a statement from Chuck Moran, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association, concerning today’s action by the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board to waive certain licensing fees for 2021.

Today, the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board announced they will be waiving some liquor licensing fees in 2021, something that the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association has been requesting as part of a larger industry survival and recovery package.

While waiving certain licensing fees won’t bring that much financial relief, it is a matter of principle to help those who are able to survive until then, and as we have said in the past, it is one piece of the puzzle.

We would have liked to have also seen 2020 fees waived or returned to licensees, something that apparently the PLCB could have done.

Clearly, more needs to be done to help small business taverns and licensed restaurants that have sacrificed the most of any industry during this pandemic. They have been the tip of the spear in this battle since day one, and have played an important role to first flatten the curve and later getting school children back in class.

Once our legislature returns to Harrisburg in November, we call upon them to take necessary steps to legislate additional forms of relief and assistance.

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About the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association
The Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association is a statewide association based in Harrisburg, representing small business taverns and licensed restaurants in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The Association formed in 1941, reorganized in 2019, and today advocates for best practices and rights within the industry as well as best experiences for patrons.

 

Members of the media interested in this topic can call the PLBTA Media Relations Department at (717) 232-8671.

By in Latest News Comments Off on Statement: Governor’s Fee-Waiving-Industry-Help Needs To Go Further

Statement: Governor’s Fee-Waiving-Industry-Help Needs To Go Further

Chuck Moran, Executive Director

The following is a statement from Chuck Moran, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association, concerning today’s announcement from Governor Wolf in support of waiving standard licensing fees.

 

Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced his support to waive “standard” 2021 licensing fees for taverns and licensed restaurants.

Earlier this year, the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association stated that a comprehensive package would be needed to bail out the industry and save jobs – including ALL licensing fees. We certainly hope that the Governor means ALL fees liquor license holders pay in his definition of “standard” including but not limited to off-premise catering, Sunday permits, and small games of chance.

While licensing fee help is part of the solution, much more needs to be done, particularly considering the size of the industry and its role in the Pennsylvania economy.

We would have liked to have seen a comprehensive package promoted by the governor.

Using the Governor’s own COVID-19 statistics for October 4 through 10, out of 2,820 contact tracing reports only 69 indicated they were at a bar during the 14 days prior to the onset of symptoms. That’s around 2 percent. His data shows that 484 individuals had visited any type of business including bars and restaurants, salons, and fitness centers. That’s about 17 percent, meaning 83 percent did not visit any type of business. That 83 percent is where the Governor should be looking to address if the Commonwealth really wants to contain a fall surge.

It is counter-productive to set up a system to protect people from COVID-19 if the system being built drives people to unsafe locations. Because of current orders, Pennsylvanians are flocking to private parties with a false sense of safety because they are amongst people they know. But no CDC guidelines are followed at those locations and those attending face increased risk.

None-the-less, since our industry will continue to be targeted causing businesses to close and jobs lost, the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association would encourage the Governor to piece together a more thorough package to include the following in addition to only waiving 2021 licensing fees:

  1. Eliminate all licensing fees for taverns and restaurants for two years including 2020 in addition to 2021
  2. Industry-specific grants, not loans
  3. Provide a higher industry discount when purchasing liquor
  4. Provide industry-specific tax relief
  5. Allow bar tops to be used for customer seating providing appropriate COVID-19 safety measures are taken.
  6. Allow taverns and restaurants to continue serving alcohol until midnight to accommodate shift workers
  7. Allow non-continuous outdoor seating following COVID-19 safety measures
  8. Eliminate the requirement that food must be purchased with any adult beverage

 

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About the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association

The Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association is a statewide association based in Harrisburg, representing small business taverns and licensed restaurants in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The Association formed in 1941, reorganized in 2019, and today advocates for best practices and rights within the industry as well as best experiences for patrons.

 

Members of the working media interested in this story may contact PLBTA Media Relations at (717) 232-8671

By in Latest News Comments Off on An Open Letter To The Pennsylvania House Of Representatives On HB 2513

An Open Letter To The Pennsylvania House Of Representatives On HB 2513

Chuck Moran, Executive Director

The following is a letter to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, sent on Monday, October 19, from the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association Executive Director Chuck Moran. The letter covers Governor Wolf’s veto of HB 2513.

 

With COVID-19 fatigue increasing, we worry that Governor Wolf’s veto of HB 2513 last Friday promotes underground gatherings and house parties, which will feed the current spike of COVID-19 cases our Commonwealth is facing. Pennsylvanians are already flocking to parties with a false sense of safety because they are amongst people they know. But no CDC guidelines are followed at those locations and those attending face increased risk. Please consider voting to override this veto – to help the state’s taverns and restaurants, and to help reduce this threat.

If Governor Wolf had signed HB 2513, those Pennsylvanians would have had safer options to enjoy a night out.

Consider what he vetoed:

  • Additional outdoor seating in unused locations within the property of taverns and licensed restaurants that are required to follow social distancing guidance (a previous amendment from Senate Democrats)
  • Use of barstools at bar countertops in both indoor and outdoor settings at licensed establishments following social distancing guidance
  • 50 percent occupancy at licensed establishments following social distancing guidance enforced for all other businesses

In the past two months, Governor Wolf allowed schools to open and increased attendance into the thousands of people at gatherings. We all know that there is no shortage of kegs, cases, and liquor bottles – and of course house parties – in college towns and elsewhere.

Our struggling neighborhood bars, taverns, and pubs are not the reason for the current spike. Through contact tracing, we know that just two percent of COVID-19 positive patients reported having been in a bar within the 14 days before testing!

The eyes of the industry are looking upon you for help. Small business taverns, their employees, and their patrons ask for your support, and a vote to override the Governor’s veto of HB 2513.

 

By in Latest News Comments Off on Statement: Governor’s Change Of Event Capacity Further Hurts Small Business Taverns And Licensed Restaurants

Statement: Governor’s Change Of Event Capacity Further Hurts Small Business Taverns And Licensed Restaurants

Chuck Moran, Executive Director

The following is a statement from Chuck Moran, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association, concerning today’s announcement from Governor Wolf to change event and gathering capacity limits.

Starting Friday Governor Wolf plans to allow increased attendance at events and gatherings, using new math that has many scratching their heads and wondering.

Two things stand out to us. First, where’s the science in the new math? And, second, the new math does more harm to small business taverns and licensed restaurants that can offer discrete gatherings.

Let’s first look at the science in the numbers. Using the Governor’s new math, an event with an indoor capacity of 2,000 people can have 400 attend, while another location that can handle 2,500 is only allowed 375.

Where’s the COVID-19 science in that?

Now, let’s look at the continued damage being inflicted on our mom-and-pop establishments. Our average Member has 100 or less seats. Previously they could have 25 people for a discrete gathering. Now it’s down to 20 with the latest math from the Governor.

The Governor’s decision is confusing, lacks science, and picks winners and losers.

While he may have thought he was helping the overall industry, Governor Wolf just put another nail in the coffin of your neighborhood, family-owned taverns and licensed restaurants.

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About the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association
The Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association is a statewide association based in Harrisburg, representing small business taverns and licensed restaurants in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The Association formed in 1941, reorganized in 2019, and today advocates for best practices and rights within the industry as well as best experiences for patrons.

Members of the media interested in an interview on this topic should call (717) 232-8671.

By in Latest News Comments Off on PLBTA Testimony: Gaming In Taverns

PLBTA Testimony: Gaming In Taverns

The following is testimony provided by Jim DeLisio, Board Member of the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association, on October 6, 2020, in front of the Pennsylvania Senate Community, Economic, and Recreational Development Committee. The topic was VGTs and skill games. Mr. DeLisio is also owner of the Racehorse Tavern in Thomasville as well as the president of the York County Tavern Association.

 

Chairman Killion, Chairman Williams, members of the Committee, good morning. I’m Jim DeLisio, owner of the Racehorse Tavern in Thomasville. I’m also a Board Member of the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association as well as President of the York County Tavern Association.

With me is Chuck Moran, executive director of the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association. Chuck will be available to help answer questions afterwards.

Let me begin by thanking you for inviting the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association to testify today about gaming in taverns.

The Tavern Association represents more than 425 small business taverns, pubs, and licensed restaurants across the state. Most of our Members own “R” and “H” licenses while some may have an “E” or even a club license. For the most part, we are your local bars, taverns, pubs, and licensed restaurants. We do not actively recruit large chains, grocery stores, or convenience stores which have an R license.

In terms of business, our average Member makes a living primarily from alcohol sales. In fact, based on our Membership studies, about 63 percent of their business is alcohol sales and 37% of sales are from food. For what it’s worth, the most popular beer served would be Bud, while the most popular mixed drink would be Jack and Coke.

Based upon Membership studies, our average member employs about 16 individuals including the owner and family members. They serve less than 4,000 customers every month. If you count the chairs and barstools, throughout my Member establishments, you’ll find less than 100 per establishment.

Simply put, my Members are your locally-owned, family-owned, mom-and-pop businesses. But they still represent an industry that employs about 140,000 Pennsylvanians.

As you know, my segment of the industry has been hit particularly hard as a result of this year’s COVID crisis. Many jobs have been lost. In fact, an August study of our Membership indicates an average of 13 employees were laid off or furloughed per establishment. That’s more than 80% of those in the business.

Furthermore, many businesses have been closed either temporary or permanently as a result of the pandemic. Those that are open have seen their business operations limited. Our Members have told us that without any change in the state’s COVID-19 order, 70 percent of small business licensed restaurants are either closed or facing closing in the upcoming year. More than one in eight has never been able to reopen since March. In the next month, another five percent say they will close. Another 29 percent say they will likely close by the end of the year, while 23 percent say they will likely close in 2021. That’s 70 percent of the state’s bar and tavern businesses.

Financially, for both employees and employers there is a high degree of uncertainty moving forward.

The COVID financial crisis comes only a few years after legislation was signed into law in which my Members lost the exclusive right to sell six packs. That was a significant financial setback for many of my Members, who have a profit margin of well under 5 percent.

And when our members suffer financially, like the clubs, families and communities lose. We have less to donate to local churches, nonprofit organizations, and youth organizations, which are a big part of what we are at heart.

Needless to say, we believe it is very important for these small businesses to find opportunities for additional revenue streams to replace what has been lost in recent years.

And, that’s where gaming can play a role. If it’s set up correctly, it will help these small businesses, local organizations, the local economy AND the state budget.

The PLBTA has a general position on gaming. We believe our Members should be allowed to offer legal forms of gaming in their establishments to entertain their patrons. That extends from small games of chance to any other legal forms of gambling, including skill/video games.

Expansion of gaming through taverns can provide that extra revenue stream that these businesses need. Expansion would help create and maintain jobs.

There’s also a benefit to other local businesses. With increased revenue, establishments likely would put some of that money back into developing their business. Maybe it helps pay for a new roof. Maybe it helps pay for a new floor.

And, of course, there’s an opportunity to help Pennsylvania’s budget with a new source of revenue.

We do, however, need to remember lessons from the past. If the state chooses to expand gaming into taverns, it must not be set up like the past small games of chance or tavern games legislation.

The end result of that legislation was not positive for the state. Very few licensed establishments chose to offer small games – less than 75 at the moment. Why? There’s little profit after taxes and payment of supplies.

With everything that has happened to the industry in the last six months in combination with significant loss of six-pack sales as a result of Act 39, for gaming expansion in taverns to work, it would have to be attractive to the tavern owner.

As legislation is debated, taverns would seek a fair share of the revenue that would make it worth their time. Taverns would also seek assistance with any type of requirements that would require additional expenses for buildouts to place machines in their establishments. As these issues are considered, we would ask that our needs be considered and that we remain stakeholders in the process, to ensure such expansion will be financially attractive to our member bars, taverns and restaurants.

Again, I thank you for the opportunity to represent small business taverns and licensed restaurants today. Chuck and I will be happy to answer any questions you may have at this time and in the future.

 

By in Latest News, Uncategorized Comments Off on Eye On The Profit Prize

Eye On The Profit Prize

Training & Marketing Can Help Optimize Margins, Increase Traffic

Business really is about making a profit through a quality product. There’s no dispute about that. Every tavern owner wants to make as much as possible to pay bills more easily, keep staff employed, and, of course, put some money away for their future.

The challenge most have is maximizing profits … especially now in light of our state’s COVID-19 crisis and various orders from the state government. So, what should a tavern owner do?

Some ways may include waitstaff training. Consider the following ideas for starters …

  1. Push the most profitable selections on the menu. How many times have you ever seen a customer ask for menu advice. A good waitress will say everything is good on a menu. A great waitress will point out items which are the most profitable to the establishment.
  2. Train your staff to work a table from start to finish. For establishments serving food, that means begin by asking patrons if they’d like to order a pre-dinner drink before their meal is ready. Then, after the meal has been consumed, your staff should ask guests if they’d like an after-dinner drink. Waitstaff should avoid leaving the bill during the meal. It makes it too easy for the customer to avoid ordering that dessert or after-dinner drink.
  3. Don’t overpour and work to reduce waste. That’s an easy way to give away profits. Staff should stick to proper measurements, and only use what is needed.
  4. Have your waitstaff and management nip customer complaints early. Complaints that go unheard or ignored will likely be heard loudly by the customer’s friends and social media followers. That bad word-of-mouth marketing will hurt your business.

Of course, an investment in marketing may also help. How about these ideas?

  1. Pay attention to social media. A bad review on Yelp or Foursquare could be doing damage. Respond to a bad review to acknowledge you heard the complaint, and that you corrected the problem.
  2. Tap the power of Facebook, Twitter, and Snapchat. All are powerful ways to get your good news out. Keep in touch with your patrons through social media.
  3. Positive word-of-mouth marketing should be a goal. Invite your patrons to share photos of themselves enjoying your establishment through your social media channels as well as their personal social media accounts.
  4. Know the “money walk” … that is, where in your establishment are the likely paths patrons will take when walking? Take advantage of those paths by placing key sales messages along the path. For example, one path may be from the parking lot into a waiting area. Another path may be to the bathrooms.

And finally, don’t forget about simple business smarts.

  1. During non-peak hours, can your establishment host local business or club meetings?
  2. Shop around for the best prices. With the World Wide Web, you’re not locked into doing business as its been done for decades. You can explore the world to get great deals on barware and supplies. Make sure you are getting at least three bids for liquor liability and business insurance.
  3. Save money by keeping an eye on utilities. A leaky faucet or toilet that doesn’t stop running is costing you money. Have you shopped around for the best electricity rates?
  4. Other than drinks, are there things your staff can sell to customers while they wait for their meal to be served? Small games of chance? Juke box? Video games? Pub gear?

 

This article was republished from the October 2020 edition of Pennsylvania Beverage Media, the official monthly magazine of the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association. 

 

By in Latest News Comments Off on Statement: PLBTA Thanks State House For Successful Concurrence Vote On HB 2513; Small Business Taverns and Licensed Restaurants Urge Governor Not To Veto This Help

Statement: PLBTA Thanks State House For Successful Concurrence Vote On HB 2513; Small Business Taverns and Licensed Restaurants Urge Governor Not To Veto This Help

Chuck Moran, Executive Director

The following is a statement from Chuck Moran, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association, concerning today’s action in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives regarding today’s concurrence vote on HB 2513.

 

Today, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives agreed with the need to help small business taverns and licensed restaurants by concurring with HB 2513 after a bi-partisan vote of 145-56. The bill now goes to Governor Wolf.

Recent amendments to HB 2513 return the industry to standards that were in place before the July 15 mitigation rule changes that have done significant damage to our small business Members across the Commonwealth. The bill allows taverns and restaurants to operate at a minimum of 50 percent capacity with social distancing and barriers in use; eliminates the requirement that alcohol sales for on-site consumption may only occur if a meal is also purchased; permits customers to sit at the bar with appropriate social distancing and/or barriers; and allows the use of noncontinuous outdoor areas within 250 feet of the main licensed building.

The governor has already stated that he will veto this bill. We urge him to reconsider that action.  It’s time for him to help the industry which has done nothing but follow the mandated guidance for six months at its own loss.  HB 2513 takes into consideration a balance of COVID safety measures and business survival needs.

To date, other than bad news, Governor Wolf has delivered nothing to help the industry survive. Meanwhile, the industry has played and continues to play its role in the COVID-19 battle. No other industry has sacrificed more than small business taverns and licensed restaurants. The industry and its employees need this help.

The Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association thanks the Pennsylvania House of Representatives for its action today, and will remember those who supported the safe reopening of the state’s bars, taverns and clubs this afternoon.  If there is a veto, we will expect those who stood up for us today to continue standing with us!

We look forward to working with the general assembly on future legislation to continue efforts in rescuing the industry and preserving jobs.

 

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About the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association

The Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association is a statewide association based in Harrisburg, representing small business taverns and licensed restaurants in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The Association formed in 1941, reorganized in 2019, and today advocates for best practices and rights within the industry as well as best experiences for patrons.

 

Members of the media interested interested in this topic may call (717) 232-8671.

By in Latest News, Uncategorized Comments Off on Statement: PLBTA Applauds State Senate In Passing HB 2513; Small Business Taverns and Licensed Restaurants Need This Help

Statement: PLBTA Applauds State Senate In Passing HB 2513; Small Business Taverns and Licensed Restaurants Need This Help

Chuck Moran, Executive Director

The following is a statement from Chuck Moran, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association, concerning today’s action in the Pennsylvania Senate regarding HB 2513.

 

Today, the Pennsylvania Senate voted to help small business taverns and licensed restaurants by passing HB 2513 by a bi-partisan vote of 43-6. The bill now goes back to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives for concurrence.

Recent amendments to HB 2513 return the industry to standards that were in place before the July 15 mitigation rule changes that have done significant damage to our small business Members across the Commonwealth. The bill allows taverns and restaurants to operate at a minimum of 50 percent capacity with continued social distancing and barriers in use; eliminates the requirement that alcohol sales for on-site consumption may only occur if a meal is also purchased; and also permits customers to sit at the bar with appropriate social distancing and/or barriers.

The industry has played and continues to play its role in the COVID-19 battle. It has been the tip of the spear since day one of the battle, and has sacrificed the most of any industry. Industry casualties are mounting as more establishments close their doors and employees lose their jobs. The industry and its employees desperately need this type of help.

HB 2513 is a safe step in the right direction. It takes into consideration a balance of COVID safety measures and business survival needs.

The Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association thanks the Pennsylvania Senate for its action today.

We look forward to working with the general assembly on future legislation to continue efforts in rescuing the industry and returning it to normal operations.

 

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About the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association

The Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association is a statewide association based in Harrisburg, representing small business taverns and licensed restaurants in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The Association formed in 1941, reorganized in 2019, and today advocates for best practices and rights within the industry as well as best experiences for patrons.

 

Members of the media can call (717) 232-8671 to request an interview on this topic.

By in Latest News Comments Off on Statement: Cutting Off Alcohol Sales At 10 p.m.? Governor’s New Rule Harmful To Small Business Taverns and Licensed Restaurants

Statement: Cutting Off Alcohol Sales At 10 p.m.? Governor’s New Rule Harmful To Small Business Taverns and Licensed Restaurants

Chuck Moran, Executive Director

The following is a statement from Chuck Moran, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association, concerning today’s announcement from the Governor’s Office to cut off alcohol sales at restaurants at 10 p.m.

 

Today’s announcement by the Governor may sound good, but as usual, the headline doesn’t fit the copy.  Announcing bars, taverns and restaurants can open September 21 to 50% does not solve the problems created by the shutdown and existing orders.

Our member bars and taverns are not making profits operating at 50% without bar service, and are facing a fall and winter without outdoor service. Furthermore, we’ve still seen no scientific justification for having to order a meal to get a beer.

Now, hidden in today’s announcement from Governor Wolf is a barely noticeable stipulation that alcohol sales at restaurants must stop at 10 p.m.

In his statement today, Governor Wolf wrote “Further, starting September 21 restaurants that have alcohol sales will close alcohol sales at 10:00 p.m.”

This rule totally discriminates against establishments that do not offer daytime service. Many establishments open late in the afternoon to serve dinner. In addition, this rule hurts shift workers getting off late who wish to have a drink with their dinner after work.

This hidden rule will help put many more establishments out of business. In a 2019 survey of Pennsylvania small business taverns and licensed restaurants, alcohol sales make up 63 percent of their business. Cutting four hours of sales off a 10- to 14-hour business operation hurts significantly.

Taverns and licensed restaurants should be required to follow science-based rules to help fight COVID-19 including masks and social distancing patron tables. But, where’s the science that says having a drink with a meal after 10 p.m. is any different than having a drink with a meal at 6 p.m.?

Already within only a couple of hours of his announcement, we are already getting many questions about the Governor’s newest rules for taverns and licensed restaurants. Why? Because this rule is very vague and confusing. For example, consider the following questions that we’ve either fielded through phone calls, emails, or on Facebook:.

How about take-out? Can a patron buy a six-pack to take home with their meal after 10 p.m.?

Since taverns and licensed restaurants typically have “R” licenses, how does this impact “R” licenses owned by grocery and convenience stores that stay open past 10 p.m.? Must they close sales of six-packs, wine and slushies at 10 p.m.? What about the clubs that sell both food and alcohol. Are they included as well?

While we’re thankful for being allowed to move back to 50%, but would prefer the same social distancing requirements of all other retailers, the 10 p.m. cutoff of alcohol sales effectively weakens any assistance Governor Wolf offered to these businesses through increased occupancy.

 

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About the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association

The Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association is a statewide association based in Harrisburg, representing small business taverns and licensed restaurants in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The Association formed in 1941, reorganized in 2019, and today advocates for best practices and rights within the industry as well as best experiences for patrons.

By in Latest News Comments Off on Survey Results: Small Business Taverns, Licensed Restaurants Severely Damaged Due To Pennsylvania’s COVID-19 Order

Survey Results: Small Business Taverns, Licensed Restaurants Severely Damaged Due To Pennsylvania’s COVID-19 Order

A survey of small business taverns and licensed restaurants indicates Pennsylvania could see a significant loss of locally owned establishments from closings as a result of the Commonwealth’s COVID-19 Orders.

The survey, conducted by the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association between August 25 and August 28, 2020, included 10 questions exploring financial difficulties.

Most troubling are indications that only 30 percent of the participating neighborhood-based establishments might survive the crisis. This is consistent with national surveys suggesting a possible loss of 70 percent of establishments.

In the PLBTA survey, participants were asked “Without any change to the Governor’s Order or financial assistance from the state and/or federal government, which best describes the future of your business after September 2020?”

Thirteen percent are already closed. Another five percent indicated they will close within a month, while 29 percent say they will likely close by the end of the year and 23 percent say they will likely close in 2021. Only 30 percent said they would not close.

Major layoffs and furloughs were also identified in the survey, again along the same lines as national studies. On average of those establishments participating in the survey, 13 employees per location lost their jobs as a result of COVID-19 Orders. When extrapolated across the industry, considering small business R and H license locations alone, about 109,200 Pennsylvania jobs were lost.

Financially, July 2020 proved to be troubling. The average establishment completing this survey lost $227,179 in July 2020 compared to July 2019.

Only 29 percent of the survey participants said they have not faced any cash flow problems. That suggests 71 percent have had difficulty paying bills including rent, utilities, and loan repayments.

“These results shouldn’t surprise anyone,” said Chuck Moran, executive director of the PLBTA. “When you’re limited to 25 percent indoor capacity and have seen increased expenses along with other difficulties due to state orders, you can expect a serious crisis to develop. This industry can’t sustain itself under these conditions. Changes in state restrictions along with survival and recovery financial packages are needed.”

The survey also explored other business-related difficulties including food and beer deliveries as well as supply deliveries for items such as paper products and cleaning items.

Of those participating in the survey, 89 percent were small business, single-location establishments, while eight percent were small businesses with more than one location. All own either an “R” or “H” liquor license. Three percent were clubs with club liquor licenses. No national or regional chains participated in the survey.

A total of 1,234 invitations to take the survey were sent statewide. There were 100 businesses that completed the survey during the three days. As a result, this survey has a 10% margin of error with a 95% confidence level when considering small business R and H licensees in Pennsylvania.

Working members of the media may request a copy of the results by emailing pataverns@pataverns.com. Please include your name and media affiliation.

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About the Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association
The Pennsylvania Licensed Beverage and Tavern Association is a statewide association based in Harrisburg, representing small business taverns and licensed restaurants in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The Association formed in 1941, reorganized in 2019, and today advocates for best practices and rights within the industry as well as best experiences for patrons.